The Wet Collections

The Wet Collections

The museum’s wet collections are of immense scientific and cultural value. In September 2010 they found a new home in the newly restored East Wing, where they are stored under optimised conditions. Why not come and take a look!
After 65 years, a large gap in the Natural History Museum building has been closed. The historic East Wing, destroyed at the end of the Second World War, has been rebuilt and now houses the museum’s extensive wet collection, comprising around one million zoological objects – from spiders, fish and crustaceans to amphibians and mammals – in 276,000 vials, preserved in 81,880 litres of ethanol. The Museum für Naturkunde now probably sports the world’s most advanced collection building for zoological wet collections. The storage conditions in this new facility meet all the latest standards in conservation and fire safety. Moreover, the high-tech collection building is not just reserved for the exclusive use of scientists and researchers studying biodiversity and evolutionary theory. Part of it has been opened up to the public and integrated into the permanent exhibition, allowing visitors a glimpse of this state-of-the-art scientific collection.

The Wet Collections: ‘before and after’ photographs

For decades the scientific wet collections were stored in the main museum building, out of sight from the public and under storage conditions that no longer lived up modern standards. The relocation of the wet collections was therefore a long-term project that finally came to fruition in September 2010.

Last update: 16.01.2014